Jacob Margolis

KPCC's Science Reporter

Jacob's time in journalism began when he was 16, when he'd skip high school to spend his days working on the mid-day newscast at KPFK in Los Angeles.

Since then he's worked at NPR in Washington, D.C., as a producer on "The Madeleine Brand Show" and "Take Two" at KPCC and as a reporter, covering the political and social impact of California's new marijuana industry.

Now, he's the science reporter for the station.

Stories by Jacob Margolis

Ughhh, it’s 100+ degrees in SoCal. Here’s why

High pressure over the Great Basin is bringing unseasonable heat to Southern California.

A warmer, drier SoCal winter might be on tap

You can credit (or blame) La Niña. These conditions were also present last year, but California was bombarded by storms.

The space race to see 2 neutron stars violently merge

Two neutron stars collided 130 million light years away, but researchers only had hours to prepare before they'd miss their window to see the event.

Linked by tragedy, San Bernardino reflects on Las Vegas

This week's mass shooting in Las Vegas has resurfaced painful memories in the Inland Empire city -- site of firearms massacre in 2015.

Invasive species, stowed away on tsunami trash, make their way to the US

When the tsunami dragged debris from Japan into the Pacific, dozens of marine species made the trash their home. They crossed the ocean and arrived on our shores.

Tiny worm caught in the act of reproducing — by tearing itself apart

The tiny, camera shy, asexual worm has been caught in the act; research on how its two halves regenerate could help scientists learn more about how stem cells work.

Breathing LA air may increase your risk of kidney disease

The culprit is particulate matter 1/25th the size of a human hair that enters the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on critical organs.

Jellyfish need their beauty sleep too, new research shows

Scientists hope that if they can figure out why jellyfish sleep, they might be able to figure out why animals, including humans, sleep too.

Ciao, Cassini: NASA spacecraft's long mission ends

Cassini's final signal was received at JPL around 5 a.m. Friday morning, signaling the "end of mission" call, followed by cheers and even some tears.

Cassini's last gasp offers unique chance to understand Saturn

While it sounds bad that scientists are crashing the Cassini spacecraft into Saturn, the final move is arguably one of the most important of the mission.

Giant asteroid to pass closely by Earth

Asteroid Florence is 2.7 miles wide, one of the largest known near-Earth objects ever spotted, and it'll pass by 4.4 million miles from Earth September 1.

Zika, HIV attack the immune system in similar ways

Once the virus enters the bloodstream of a pregnant woman it tricks the immune system, suppresses it and spreads quickly.

When and how to see the solar eclipse in LA (without blinding yourself)

On Aug. 21, the moon will cross in between the earth and the sun, the land will darken, the temperature will drop and we'll see an astronomical phenomenon.

Saturn's snow moon is coated in fresh powder — and possibly life

Saturn's sixth largest moon is a winter wonderland, always covered in a fresh layer of snow. If you had a spacesuit and gnarly set of skis, you might be good to go.

By 2100, SoCal could see average summer temps in triple digits

New studies predict heat waves and droughts will become more common as temperatures continue to rise. Rising seas are also likely swamp low-lying areas.