Business | Explaining Southern California's economy

Trump's labor pick is no fan of California's overtime, rest break rules

Trump tapped Andrew Puzder, who runs the parent company for Carl's Jr. Despite the burger chain's long history in California, Puzder said they would grow elsewhere.
More from Trump & California
Jack Plunkett/AP Images for Carl's Jr.
Business & Economy Events at KPCC

KPCC hosts free events that open dialogue and deepen the understanding of vital issues affecting Southern California. See our in-studio events.

Business Resources

Tools and guides to help you get informed and engaged.

KPCC believes that making Business in Southern California relevant and accessible is an important part of strengthening the civic and cultural bonds that unite the diverse communities of this region.

Recent Business & Economy coverage

California's gender wage gap is now the narrowest in the country

|

Gender pay equity advocates say California has strong policies in place, such as the state’s paid family leave law.

Audio

California's high poverty rate still leads the nation

|

By many measures, California's economy is doing great. But nearly one in five Californians — or roughly 7.5 million residents — still live in poverty.

Audio

Los Angeles continues crack down on illegal pot shops

|

We're now more than eight months into California's legalization of recreational marijuana. But there are still illegal pot shops all over Los Angeles.

Audio

LA County approves funding for cities to address homelessness

|

Homelessness touches every part of Los Angeles County. But the problems aren't the same in every city.

Audio

Scooter company Bird gets to stay in Santa Monica after all

|

In recent weeks, it looked like Bird could have been banned from its hometown. But on Thursday, Santa Monica decided to let Bird stay.

Audio

Thousands of Californians Live In Their Vehicles. This Lawsuit Challenges Cities’ Authority To Impound Their Homes

|

For thousands of homeless people living in their cars across California, impoundment can be the tipping point into joblessness and a life on the streets.

Audio

What Trump's new tariffs mean for LA's economy

|

China is the Port of LA's biggest trading partner. And some local tech startups — including electric scooter company Bird — rely on Chinese imports.

Audio

More Business & Economy

LA is bringing back a program to help middle class families buy homes

|

Families of four earning up to $116,300 could qualify for a zero-interest, deferred loan of up to $60,000. But the money could go fast.

Audio

Sherman Oaks residents brace for possible new Burbank flight noise

|

Twenty-one Southern California airports now use more precise satellite-guided flight paths under a new FAA program that was completed this year.  But newly proposed updates to two routes out of Burbank are raising concerns in Sherman Oaks.

Audio

Pot delivery businesses and city officials spar over new rule

|

State cannabis regulators have proposed a new rule that would allow pot delivery anywhere in California — even in cities with local bans.

Audio

CA court says loan interest rates can be 'unconscionable'

|

Can interest rates be so high that they're illegal? The California Supreme Court said yes, in connection with a case involving Orange County lender CashCall.

Audio

This Orange County couple is clawing their way out of homelessness — and texting us on the way

|

The county moved them from the Santa Ana riverbed into a motel — and now they have less than a week before they'll be forced to move again.

LA voters won't be asked to raise pot taxes after all

|

City council members had put a measure on the November ballot asking voters if they wanted to raise local pot taxes by another one percent. But now it's gone.

Audio

Where do people get money for CA homes? Often, mom and dad

|

Federal data shows first-time buyers in California increasingly rely on family for help.

Audio

One state, unaffordable: Your housing questions, answered

|

When it comes to living in California and why it costs so much — you have a lot of questions. We set out to get answers.

LA adopts new rules for banks wanting to hold the city's money

|

The new requirements come in the wake of scandals involving Wells Fargo, which currently handles most of the city's deposits.

Audio